Talent

  • Creating a Business Blog that Increases Recognition and Reputation

    By Rob Carey

    When going up against larger competitors, one factor midsized firms struggle to overcome is the difference in marketing budgets. Fortunately, the Internet is the great equalizer when it comes to garnering exposure and building brand awareness, affinity and trust. One way to leverage the Internet is through the use of a business blog that employees contribute to regularly. Although larger companies can potentially throw more people and money at content marketing, it's content quality, rather than quantity, that wins the day. In fact, quantity becomes a disadvantage when a blog publishes low-quality posts; readers eventually tune out the brand. This controllable factor gives midsized firms a fighting chance at attracting eyeballs just as well as, and possibly even better than, the big guys.

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  • How to Implement Employee Training and Peer Mentorship

    Employee training serves so many valuable functions for a middle market company — it enhances the skills of individuals within your organization, and it's a retention tool that directly engages your workforce in a career-long developmental process. When you provide employee training, your company invests in its people, and subsequently your people decide to invest their best efforts in your company.

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  • 4 Steps to Successful Conflict Management

    Conflict management is one of any manager's most challenging functions. If teams are unable to resolve conflicts that arise during everyday work life, collaboration may be jeopardized. Strife can come from mundane things such as who gets the best work space or newest laptop, or from more important decisions like organizing and scheduling a major project. Managers need to collect opinions and feedback from their teams and then make the best decision for everyone. This means facilitating discussions and understanding that not everyone will be pleased. If you're a manager approaching any kind of decision, here are some steps to consider when dealing with conflict:

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  • Are You Shaping A Legacy?

    The line between “business” and “life” can at times become blurry for Middle Market CEOs. You’ve spent years nurturing the business, and if your firm is a family one, you see your colleagues at every family gathering. When life and business are so intertwined, it’s hard to think about handing things over to someone else. But careful succession planning is key to shaping both a legacy and your business’s future.  Read More >
  • Move over extraverts: why introverts are more powerful than you think

    This year sees some landmark anniversaries. Bill Gates, frequently cited as the wealthiest person alive, turns 60. J.K. Rowling, whose fortune is valued at approximately $830 million, turns 50, and we recognize the 150th anniversary of the death of Abraham Lincoln.

    While there can be little doubt as to the inordinate successes of these individuals, each also shares a characteristic that we don’t commonly associate with prominence and power: Introversion. The trait of introversion has been misunderstood for as long as we have had a language to describe it. At best, introverts are often branded as “shy” or “socially awkward,” at worst they are “uncooperative,” “neurotic” and “problem children.”

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  • Maximizing Employee Recruitment Efforts With LinkedIn

    By Rob Carey

    Business success primarily hinges on having talented personnel employed at your company. Put another way, every position occupied by an employee of lesser quality than what's possible in the role causes some type of drag on organizational performance. At midsized companies in particular, the effects of suboptimal talent are magnified. Because of the smaller numbers at midmarket firms, employees are more keenly aware of their colleagues and their potential to contribute, meaning a lack of proficiency in even one spot may cause frustration that damages morale and productivity across a wide swath of the organization.

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  • Keys to Properly Onboarding Executives Who Come From Larger Companies

    By Rob Carey

    The skills and experience possessed by an executive who learned and matured within a large corporation bring significant value to a middle market company. However, executives who come from such a different structure and culture are probably not going to be able to "plug and play." In other words, they'll need guidance during the onboarding process in order for them to fit usefully among the people and processes of their new middle market firm.

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  • Best Places to Work in the Middle Market: How Culture Breeds Success

    Fortune publishes an annual list of the best places to work, which is complied by Great Place to Work. If the most recent list is any indication, the best middle market companies thrive by having strong organizational cultures that retain talented employees. They offer incentive-based compensation, work-life balance, training and development opportunities, cultures of sharing and transparency, and consistent leadership. While middle market companies don't have the instant brand recognition or financial resources of giant companies, middle market companies often offer a distinct advantage in the form of a more family-oriented and tight-knit culture.

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  • Interview Questions and Strategies to Gauge a Candidate's Cultural Fit

    It takes more than your average, run-of-the-mill interview questions to determine whether a potential hire will fit well into your middle market company's culture. Going beyond canned questions and prepackaged answers increases the likelihood of bringing aboard someone who meshes well with your current team. Obviously, talent and experience go a long way, but it's all for naught if a new hire can't get along with everyone else.

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